Kashmir Fact Finding Mission: Democracy Now

Kashmir remains under tight restrictions after India revoked the special status of the Indian-controlled part of the Muslim-majority region. India imposed a curfew, cut off all communications and reportedly arrested more than 4,000 people, including many political leaders. We speak with Kavita Krishnan, a leading women’s rights activist in India who just returned from a fact-finding mission to Kashmir. She is the secretary of the All India Progressive Women’s Association and a member of the Communist Party of India (Marxist-Leninist). “We felt that the whole of Kashmir was one big jail,” Krishnan says. “Decisions are being taken about the Kashmiri people without any semblance, even a pretense, of consulting them. … All you are left with is open, brutal military control of the Kashmiri people.”

“One Big Jail”: Fact-Finding Mission Finds Widespread Abuses in Kashmir as India Tightens Grip
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#TheKashmirSyllabus by #StandwithKashmir

#TheKashmirSyllabus compiles a list of sources for teaching and learning about Kashmir. It foregrounds voices, histories, and aspirations of people from within Kashmir, and moves beyond prior scholarship that often took security studies approaches and thereby privileged the statist perspectives of India and Pakistan. This critical body of work on Kashmir allows for a lens into the broader study of the modern state, occupation, nationalism, sovereignty, militarization, social movements, resistance, human rights, international law, and self-determination.

standwithkashmir.org

I would highly recommend following this website/social media handles for the latest on Kashmir. The syllabus is a much needed one. Please do send in recommendations to thekashmirsyllabus@gmail.com

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Tulips in bloom in Kashmir

“Kashmir today, then, is Karbala more than ever” Mirza Waheed

All of it joins up to form a long, forever ringing arc of sadness and despair. Every bullet sound, every death, every howl, through years and decades of Kashmir’s solitary, cold suffering. For years now, for long decades now (with profound apologies to Agha Shahid), death has “turned every day in Kashmir into some family’s Karbala.”

Kashmir today, then, is Karbala more than ever. In its grief, in its vast tragedy, and in its lonely but resolute defiance. But when the houses are burned, when the children are slaughtered or their eyes stolen, Kashmir will still remain.

Waheed, Mirza. The Blood of Tulips. Dawn. August 11th 2019.

Mirza Waheed starts off this article looking at the tulip garden of Kashmir that moves into a heart breaking retelling of Kashmir’s never ending suffering. If there’s one thing you will read on Kashmir during this brutal start to Autumn let it be this.

Yrsa Daley-Ward Breaks Out of the “Instapoetry” Pack with Her Memoir “The Terrible”

Daley-Ward’s themes—addiction, mental illness, sexuality, body image, womanhood, self-expression—are familiar territory for Instapoetry. In addition, “The Terrible” has the experimental form and style one associates with verse more generally: there are invented words (“blackshining,” “powerfear,” “diediedie”), promiscuous italics and capitalizations, and irregular typefaces. Lines of text hover in fields of white space or are stacked into perfect rectangles. Daley-Ward prefers evocative fragments (“these parents of ours / our makers / our stars”) to complete sentences. Some chapters unfold as scenes in a play, replete with stage directions. (“YOU go the bathroom and struggle to peel this leather costume off your skin.”)

Daley-Ward, a British writer and model, embodies select elements of Instagram poetry while skirting its worst hazards.

Source: Yrsa Daley-Ward Breaks Out of the “Instapoetry” Pack with Her Memoir “The Terrible”