Category Archives: Global South

I’m Done With African Immigrant Literature

African literature cannot move forward if our most celebrated authors are writing about America and Europe, writes Siyanda Mohutsiwa.

I’m over it: Immigrant Literature

I don’t know when it happened. It might have been somewhere in the middle of Teju Cole’s Open City, as I followed his protagonist around the streets of New York. Or maybe it was at the end of NoViolet Bulawayo’s We Need New Names, when I boarded the flight to America with its precocious star. Or perhaps it was a few weeks after finishing Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s Americanah, and I had finally begun to forget the stress carried by illegal African immigrants in Europe.

Whichever way it happened, it happened. And I found myself flinging my copy of The Granta Book of the African Story across the room, vowing to never read a piece of African Fiction again, or at least its “Afropolitan” variety.

Let me explain.

Source: I’m Done With African Immigrant Literature

The World According to Black Women Photographers

The book’s 100 photographers range from 13 to 91 with work across genres. “What I love about this is that midcareer and emerging women are highlighted,” Ms. Barrayan said. She met the youngest photographer, 13-year-old Fanta Diop, at the Bronx Documentary Center where she is a member of the Bronx Junior Photo League. She met the oldest, 91-year-old Mildred Harris Jackson, through Karen Taylor, the founder of While We Are Still Here, a historic preservation group devoted to Harlem’s famed Sugar Hill neighborhood, which has been home to many cultural and political luminaries. Armed with a Brownie that was given to her as a Christmas present, she documented her family and neighborhood from her teenage years through her mid-30s.

Source: The World According to Black Women Photographers

Remembering Berta Cáceres

March 3rd 2017 marked one year since the assassination of the Honduran environmental, indigenous activist, Berta Cáceres. Here are some links to knowing more about what was truly a tragic end to a life, a woman, an activist who fought long and hard.

Berta was a co-founder of the Consejo Cívico de Organizaciones Populares e Indígenas de Honduras (COPINH), an organization fighting neoliberalism and patriarchy in Honduras and working for respect of human rights and the rights of indigenous peoples in particular. She was a long-term opponent of internationally funded exploitative development projects in indigenous territories in Honduras, such as the Agua Zarca hydroelectric dam, set to be built on the territory of the Lenca people in the Río Blanco.

Berta’s name had been on a hit-list of social and environmental activists given to a US-trained specialist military unit in Honduras months before her death. Recent information leaked from court proceedings suggest a leading role was played in her assassination by Honduran military intelligence services.

Source: https://roarmag.org/essays/berta-caceres-honduras/