Tag Archives: Black Feminism

The World According to Black Women Photographers

The book’s 100 photographers range from 13 to 91 with work across genres. “What I love about this is that midcareer and emerging women are highlighted,” Ms. Barrayan said. She met the youngest photographer, 13-year-old Fanta Diop, at the Bronx Documentary Center where she is a member of the Bronx Junior Photo League. She met the oldest, 91-year-old Mildred Harris Jackson, through Karen Taylor, the founder of While We Are Still Here, a historic preservation group devoted to Harlem’s famed Sugar Hill neighborhood, which has been home to many cultural and political luminaries. Armed with a Brownie that was given to her as a Christmas present, she documented her family and neighborhood from her teenage years through her mid-30s.

Source: The World According to Black Women Photographers

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Osborne Macharia on Honoring Kenya’s Female Freedom Fighters with Opulent Hair

KIPIRIRI 4 honors female freedom fighters who seldom get the props they deserve, but looking at Macharia’s images, you will question their lack of representation in popular culture. His pictures are a glowing tribute to the women who fought for Kenya’s independence in 1963 during the Mau Mau movement, but never got their due.

The fictitious series, KIPIPIRI 4, features majestic manes that are symbolic of the roles each woman played in a village located in the Kipipiri Forest. One woman hides weapons in her hair; another uses her singing voice to inspire her community; the remaining two focus on transporting food and communicating secret messages all using different coiffures.

Source: Osborne Macharia on Honoring Kenya’s Female Freedom Fighters with Opulent Hair

Ida B Wells

I came across Ida Wells today while looking at tweets addressing the Black Lives Matter movement and here are a couple of links to some extraordinary work by her. The lynchings are a bit close home and resonate with the killings of dalit men here, here and here as well as the ‘ghar wapsi‘ and ‘love jihad‘ rabid hatred.

“Ida Bell Wells-Barnett (July 16, 1862 – March 25, 1931) was an African-American journalist, newspaper editor, suffragist, sociologist, and an early leader in the civil rights movement. She documented lynching in the United States, showing that it was often used as a way to control or punish blacks who competed with whites, rather than being based in criminal acts by blacks, as was usually claimed by white mobs. She was active in women’s rights and the women’s suffrage movement, establishing several notable women’s organizations. Wells was a skilled and persuasive rhetorician, and traveled internationally on lecture tours.”

Here’s a link to her book – Southern Horrors: Lynch Law in all its phases