Tag Archives: Photography

Time not making pictures is just as important as time making them. One depends on the other.

Carolynne watches EJ play in the window while Rich is gone on a business trip. Carolynne says she worries about taking EJ outside alone because she no longer has the energy to keep up with him.

Although I could convey a moment and capture peak action and even humor in my pictures, I didn’t know how to wade into situations of emotional intimacy. After discussing the problem with Dan Habib, the paper’s photo editor, I knew I had to try something different. I had heard about approaching an assignment as a fly on the wall, and this appealed to the introvert in me, but I made a conscious decision to break out of that mold. For my next long-form project, I resolved to invest in a close relationship with my subject. Once I had tried it, I decided, I would assess the outcome and move forward.

Source: http://www.pulitzer.org/article/preston-gannaway-bringing-intimacy-photography

The Fleeting Beauty of New York City’s Golden Hour

After the slog of commuting and working on a New York summer day, walking outside into the light of the golden hour can be a salve in itself. That fleeting period of time—shortly before the sun sets, or after it rises, when shadows grow longer and everything appears to glow—lends us an opportunity to reconsider the world around us, recast in warm color. To mark the seventieth anniversary of Magnum Photos, The New Yorker asked the storied agency’s photographers, who were in town, last week, for their annual meeting, to capture New York City during the evening golden hour. The physical distance between the resulting photographs, a few of which were taken on days when the weather yielded more blue light than gold, is quietly underscored by the emotional distance in them: in Midtown, a lone white-haired man walks an empty road, bowing toward the sun, while Pride Parade revellers in the West Village seem to welcome the oncoming night. Viewed together, these images offer a portrait of the city in the vanishing light of long summer evenings. “In my mind,” the Magnum photographer Peter van Agtmael told me, “sometimes the shadows the light casts are more interesting than the light itself.”

Source: The Fleeting Beauty of New York City’s Golden Hour

The Faces Behind Craigslist’s “Strictly Platonic” Personal Ads

“On any person who desires such queer prizes,” E. B. White wrote in his classic essay “Here Is New York,” in 1949, “New York will bestow the gift of loneliness.” It remains an essential paradox of the city—that a place with so many people living so close together can also be so isolating. This is one of the phenomena that the photographer Peter Garritano hoped to explore in “Seeking,” a series of portraits of New Yorkers who have posted advertisements in the Strictly Platonic personals section of Craigslist. The world has acclimated to the fact that people might go online to find a mate, but there are fewer formal avenues through which to find friends, perhaps because friendship is not always acknowledged as something that people have to go out in search of. “We already know everyone’s looking for love,” Garritano told me in an e-mail. “I’m more concerned with our social requirements beyond romance.”

Source: The Faces Behind Craigslist’s “Strictly Platonic” Personal Ads

The World According to Black Women Photographers

The book’s 100 photographers range from 13 to 91 with work across genres. “What I love about this is that midcareer and emerging women are highlighted,” Ms. Barrayan said. She met the youngest photographer, 13-year-old Fanta Diop, at the Bronx Documentary Center where she is a member of the Bronx Junior Photo League. She met the oldest, 91-year-old Mildred Harris Jackson, through Karen Taylor, the founder of While We Are Still Here, a historic preservation group devoted to Harlem’s famed Sugar Hill neighborhood, which has been home to many cultural and political luminaries. Armed with a Brownie that was given to her as a Christmas present, she documented her family and neighborhood from her teenage years through her mid-30s.

Source: The World According to Black Women Photographers