Tag Archives: Poetry

Yrsa Daley-Ward Breaks Out of the “Instapoetry” Pack with Her Memoir “The Terrible”

Daley-Ward’s themes—addiction, mental illness, sexuality, body image, womanhood, self-expression—are familiar territory for Instapoetry. In addition, “The Terrible” has the experimental form and style one associates with verse more generally: there are invented words (“blackshining,” “powerfear,” “diediedie”), promiscuous italics and capitalizations, and irregular typefaces. Lines of text hover in fields of white space or are stacked into perfect rectangles. Daley-Ward prefers evocative fragments (“these parents of ours / our makers / our stars”) to complete sentences. Some chapters unfold as scenes in a play, replete with stage directions. (“YOU go the bathroom and struggle to peel this leather costume off your skin.”)

Daley-Ward, a British writer and model, embodies select elements of Instagram poetry while skirting its worst hazards.

Source: Yrsa Daley-Ward Breaks Out of the “Instapoetry” Pack with Her Memoir “The Terrible”

Advertisements

Double Solitude – The New Yorker

Now and then, especially at night, solitude loses its soft power and loneliness takes over. I am grateful when solitude returns.

“At eighty-seven, I am solitary. I live by myself on one floor of the 1803 farmhouse where my family has lived since the Civil War. After my grandfather died, my grandmother Kate lived here alone. Her three daughters visited her. In 1975, Kate died at ninety-seven, and I took over. Forty-odd years later, I spend my days alone in one of two chairs. From an overstuffed blue chair in my living room I look out the window at the unpainted old barn, golden and empty of its cows and of Riley the horse. I look at a tulip; I look at snow. In the parlor’s mechanical chair, I write these paragraphs and dictate letters. I also watch television news, often without listening, and lie back in the enormous comfort of solitude.”

Source: Double Solitude – The New Yorker